How Copywriting and Project Management are One in the Same: Our Three Main Responsibilities

 

To be a successful copywriter, you must attain the same skillset as a project manager. Project managers handle projects from start to finish, making sure that they are available to step in, guide and, to a great degree, control every step of the   way.

 Here are the three main roles of a copywriter that can be accomplished with the knowledge and skills of a project manager:

 

1. To develop concise strategies; not one of which are the same.

The intensity of the strategy ranges from client to client:

What kind of content do they need?

Are you compiling work for a website, or are you writing articles monthly?
Is SEO involved or is it solely for education based purposes?
Do you have to build new blogs for them; is guest blogging included?

These factors all influence the length and detail of your content plan.

What is their budget?
How many articles are you writing and how technical will they be? The amount of time you schedule to do research for/write each article depends on the amount they are paying you. 

How well do they correspond with you?
The better a client communicates with you, the stronger your content plan will be. A strategy’s success relies on precise organisation skills, which includes regular interaction with your clients (brainstorming, approval, feedback etc.).

2. To manage work that runs through a string of people

As a copywriter (or, content manager/copywriter in this case), you must overlook every step of a project’s process; even steps that other team members must complete, because the quality of the end-product is in your hands. This means:

  • delegating content to the right copywriters, evenly
  • overlooking editing procedures
  • following up on/completing blogging
  • communicating with guest blogging services
  • reporting back to clients

If a digital marketing firm has multiple departments (SEO, social media, and AdWords to name a few) then projects can bounce around quite a lot. If a copywriter drops the ball, other departments might suffer!

3. Predict problems and handle them when they arise

It’s inevitable for a problem or two to come up during a project. Copywriters must have tricks up their sleeves to combat the disastrous effect that some issues may cause!

Here is a scenario for example:
Your month’s calendar is choc-a-block full with due dates, but you are comfortable with the time set aside for each task and you trust that the month will run smoothly. Suddenly, you get 4 or 5 ad-hoc assignments throughout one week, each marked as ‘urgent’. You have to finish them first. You can’t drop your other clients, but you simply don’t know how you are going to fit it all in. Well, when this problem arises, ask:
 

  • Do you have spare budget in case of unforeseen outsourced articles to trusty writers?
  • Did you surprise yourself with spare time at the end of the month? (I like to call this ghost-week: make sure that your strategy plan revolves around 3 of the 4 weeks of the month, and spare yourself those last few days to make up for the mayhem of the month).
  • Do you have spare brainstormed articles reserved for the sudden case of writer’s-block?

Copywriters must always make provisions for the unexpected, and ride the wave of chaos with a smile!

It’s time to start improving your copywriting/content management skills. You could either join an accredited course that will teach you all there is to know about project management, or you could contact digital marketing professionals, who can help you with your content and strategy plan until you feel safer working on your own.

You may also want to read:

Digital